Literature online : B

  • -Les sortir du fourreau pour les escher-  Daniel Babo, Savoir prendre la truite, BiblioPêche/Danae, Paris, 1995, p. 39.
  • -Scouting for Girls-  Robert Baden-Powell, Scouting for Girls, adapted from Girl Guiding, New York, 1918.
  • A perfect and shapely cylinder-  L.N. BadenochRomance of the Insect World, Londres et New York, Mac Millan & Co., 1893, p. 105-106.
  • -Saul/Paul-  Lea Baechler, A. Litz, & Leonard Unger, American Writers: a collection of Literary Biographies,  Scribner, 1991, p. 548.
  • -Moving objects-  Walter Bagshaw, « Instantaneous Exposure in Photomicrography », Londres, Journal of the Royal Microscopical Society, 1911, p. 721.
  • Captain caddis’ adventure-  Carolyn Sherwin BaileySurprise stories, Chicago, Albert Whitman, 1923, p. 29-37.
  • A very pretty effect will be produced-  W. G. Bainbridge, The Fly-Fisher’s Guide to Aquatic Flies and Their Imitations, Londres, A. & C. Black, 1936, p. 16-18.
  • -Do any animal dress ?-  John R. BakerBiology in Everyday Life, Ferring  WorthingBaker Press (1933) 2007, p. 25-26.
  • -My wife-  Samuel White Baker, The Albert-Nyanza, Great Basin of the Nile and Explorations of the Niles Sources, Philadelphie, J. B. Lippincott, 1868, p. 323.
  • -A propos de Léonard Baldner-  Léonard Baldner & Ferd. Reiber, L’Histoire Naturelle des Eaux Strasbourgeoises de Léonard Baldner (1666) , Colmar, Imprimerie et Lithographie de Veuve Camille Decker, 1887, p. 107.
  • -The majority-  Frank Balfour-Browne, Insects, Londres, Thortnton Butterworth, 1927, p. 73.
  • -The Story of Fanny Lillian Ballou-  Lilian E. Ballou, The Story of Fanny Lillian Ballou, 1922.
  • -It was about a quarter of two P.M. when…–  Mary E. Bamford, The Second Year of the Look-about Club, Ill. Hiram Barnes, Boston, Lothrop Lee & Shepard, 1889, p. 135-143.
  • -Le fagot qui marche-  Georges BarbarinLa vie agitée des eaux dormantes, Paris, Stock, 1937, p. 109-110.
  • -Logé dans une espèce de tuyau- James BarbutLes genres des insectes de Linnéconstatés par divers échantillons d’insectes d’Angleterre copiés d’après nature, Londres, Jacques Dixwell, 1781.
  • Si vous avez l’occasion-  A. Baring, Les merveilles de la campagne, Paris, Hachette, 1969.
  • -Cage- Sabine Baring-Gould, Castles and Cave Dwellings of Europe, ReadHowYouWant, 2008. 
  • Brandlins, Gentles, Paste or Cadice-  Thomas Barker, The Art of Angling: wherein are discovered many rare secrets, very necessary to be knowne by all that delight in that recreation, Londres, 1653.
  • The design of the case-  Will BarkerFamiliar Insects of America, New York, Harper & Brothers, 1960, p. 222.
  • Although not organic, it is an outer casing-  J. Barnard, Animal Behaviour Ecology and Evolution, New Yrok, John Wiley, 1983, p. 125
  • Behavior-  Behaviour in  Animals and Man, Londres,  MacGibbon & Kee, 1967.
  • When she’d closed her eyes-  Andrea Barrett, Secret Harmonies, Londres, Simon & Schuster, 1990, p. 166.
  • -The smell of the Caddis-  James Matthews Barrie, The Novels, Tales, and Sketches, The Little minister, Londres, Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1898.
  • -The Waterloo Bridge omnibuses-  Oswald Barron, « Day in and day out »Londoner of the Evening News, Londres, Cassell & Co., 1924.
  • -Retouches-  Julien Barry, Neurobiologie de la pensée, Lille, Pup du Septentrion, 1998, p. 146.
  • -Débris agglutinés-  Georgette Barthélémy, La vie dans les eaux douces, Paris, Nathan, 1973, p. 25.
  • -Mr Caddis worm has a very soft little body-  Florence BassNature stories for young readers: animal life, Boston, D.C. Heath & Co., 1895, p. 51-53.
  • -A funny little house–  Florence Bass, Wendy Kramer, Julia WrightChristian Liberty Nature Reader Book, Arlington Heights. Illinois, Christian Liberty Press, 1996, p. 41-42.
  • Prendre le pouls-  Rick Bass, Le livre de Yaak, traduit de l’américain par Camille Fort-Cantoni, Paris, Gallmeister, (2007), 2013, p. 25.
  • -Its ancestors have used before-  Harold Bastin, « Maskend Insects », The Pageant of Nature, vol. III, Londres, Édité par P. Chalmers Mitchell, The Waverley Book Company, circa 1910.
  • -Fragment of paper-  Harold BastinFreaks and marvels of insect life, Londres, Hutchinson, 1954, p. 104-105.
  • Man is a collecting animal- Percy Bate, « Historic English Drinking Glasses »,  The Studio an Illustrated Magazine of Fine & Applied Art, , Londres,  octobre 1901, p. 106.
  • -Pieces of all kinds of mater imaginables-  James A. Bateman, Animals Traps &Trapping, Londres, Coch-y-Bonddu, 2003.
  • -In a saucer-  Gregory C. BatemanFresh-Water Aquaria: their Construction, Arrangement, and Management, Londres,  L. Upton Gill, 1892, p. 274-279.
  • -Unwonted houses-  H.M. Batson, Book of the country and the garden, Londres, Methuen & Co., 1903, p. 230.
  • Uncomfortable without any clothes-  Mrs Battersby, « The Young Insect-Hunter », Londres, The Children’s Own Magazine, 1869, p. 132.
  • -For the castle-  Aubyn Battye, « Upon a day », Longman’s Magazine, Londres, Charles James Longman, vol.17, 1891, p. 609.
  • Make a ciment-  Robert Slater Bayley, Nature considered as a Revelation, Londres, Hamilton, Adams and Co., 1836, p. 155.
  • -The contemporary factors-  Helton Godwin BaynesAnalytical psychology and the English mind and other papers, Londres, Methuen & Co., 1950, p. 167.
  • Tailleurs d’habits-  Gilles Augustin BazinAbrégé de l’histoire des insectes. Pour servir de suite à l’Histoire Naturelle des Abeilles  Tome III,  Paris,  Chez Hippolyte-Louis Guerin, 1744- 1751, p. 399-406.
  • Pour arrêter ses ennemis-  Eugène Bazin, Du spectacle de l’Univers et de quelques-uns des lois de la nature, Versailles, Imprimerie Cerf, 1869, p. 23.
  • -Incorrigible mischief-makers-  Daniel Beard, What to Do and how to Do it : The American Boy’s Handy Book, C. Scribner’s, 1901, p. 55.
  • -The picture at the right- L.Beauchamp, G. O. Blouch & M. Melrose, Discovering our Wold, A Course in Science for the Middle Grades, 2, Toronto, W. J. Gage, 1940, p. 328.
  • -Anti-épilectiques-  Laure Beaumont-Maillet (Dir.), D’après Nature : chef d’oeuvre de l’Art naturaliste en Alsace de 1450 à 1800,  Strasbourg, Creamus, Andromaque, 1994.
  • A Arbois-  Charles Beauquier, Faune et flore populaires de la Franche-Comté, vol. 1, Paris, E. Leroux, 1910, p. 360.
  • -Petits interstices-  Gaspard Guillard de Beaurieu, Abrégé de l’Histoire des Insectes dédié aux jeunes personnes,  tome I, Paris, Panckoucke, 1764, p. 327.
  • -La charrée-  Gaspard Guillard de Beaurieu, Cours d’histoire naturelle ou Tableau de la nature considérée dans l’homme, les quadrupèdes, les oiseaux, les poissons et les insectes, tome VIIParis,  Bossange, Masson & Besson, 1794-95, p. 234-235.
  • -The friction of his fur-  Arthur Henry BeavanTube, Train, Tram and Car, Or Up-to-date locomotion, Londres, Routledge &  Son, 1903, p. 75.
  • The serie of houses-  Mitchell Beazley, Joy of Knowledge, the comprehensive home reference library, vol. 1, (1976), 1987, p.9
  • Composed of clay-  Beck, « Notes on the Geology of Denmark (Beck) », Proceedings of the  Geological Society of  London, Londres, vol. 2, n° 43, 1835.
  • Qui n’a pas remarqué-  Pierre BeckAnimaux d’aquarium et de terrarium, Éditions du Scarabée, 1965, p. 62.
  • -Some body and short legs emerge-  Trevor Beebee, Pond Life, Londres, Whittet Books, 1988, p. 68-69.
  • -Sacrifice-  Henry Augustin BeersInitial Studies in American Letters, New York, Chatauqua Press, (1891) 1895, p. 258.
  • The common name-  Samuel Orchart BeetonBeeton’s Dictionary of Natural History: A Compendious cyclopaedia of the animal kingdom, Londres, Ward, Lock & Co., 1871.
  • Use of a waterproof cement-  Samuel Orchart Beeton, Beeton’s Famous Voyages, Brigand Adventures, Tales of Battlefield, Life and Nature, Londres, Ward, Lock & Tyler, 1873, p. 323.
  • Avec de grandes chances de succès- Marius Béguin, « La truite en ruisseau », Paris, Le Chasseur Français n°623 décembre 1948, p. 257.
  • Room by room-  Neil Bell, One of the Best, Londres, Eyre & Spottiswoode, 1952, p. 43
  • -Donation Daniel Cordier-  Harry Bellet, « Valabrègue » Paris, Donations Daniel Cordierle regard d’un amateur, Centre George Pompidou, 1989, p. 462.
  • Les Français les appellent charrées-  Pierre BelonDe aquatilibus libro duo cum iconibus ad vivant ipsorum effigiem quoad ejus fieri potuit expressis, Paris, Ch. Estienne, 1553, p. 436 et 443.
  • -Une sorte de tuyau-  Er. BelzungCours élémentaire de Zoologie pour la classe de sixième, Paris, Félix Alcan, 1890, p. 23.
  • -Plannorbis vortex- Reginald A. R. Bennett, « The Fresh Water Aquarium », The Boys Own Paper, Londres, n° 1079, 16 septembre, 1899, p. 812-815
  • We silently placed the netting Arthur Christoher BensonLife and Letters of Maggie Benson, Londres, John Murray, 1917, p. 37
  • The little box of broken, dusty butterflies-  Robert Hugh Benson, The Coward, Hutchinson 1912, p. 307
  • No, I’m not-  Edward Frederic BensonDavid Blaize and the blue door, Londres, Hodder & Stoughton, 1919.
  • -My sister Maggie-  Edward Frederic BensonOur Family Affairs 1867-1896, New York , George H. Doran,  1921, p. 68.
  • -Piece of worsted yarn- Mary R. Berenbaum, Ninety-nine Gnats, Nits and Nibblers, Ill. John Parker Sherrod, Urbana & Chicago, University of Illinois Press, 1989, p. 185.
  • -Il est un dont vous connaissez bien la larve-  Paul Bert, Premières notions de Zoologie, Paris, G. Masson, 1885, p. 113. 
  • Qui tient à la fois de la cuirasse et de la maison-  Henry BerthoudLe monde des insectes, Paris, Garnier Frères, 1864, p. 270.
  • -L’on reste confondu devant l’ingéniosité-  Léon BertinLa vie des animaux, tome premier, Paris, Larousse, 1949, p. 225-226.
  • Il arrive quelquefois-  J. E. BertrandDescription des Arts et Métiers faites ou approuvées par Messieurs de l’Académie Royale des Sciences de Paris, tome V., Neuchâtel,  Imprimerie de la Société Typographique,  1776, p. 102-103.
  • -La lumière des tubes-  Jeanine Bertrand-Sarfati, Pierre Freytet et Jean-Claude Plaziat, « Les calcaires concrétionnés de la limite Oligocène-Miocène des environs de Saint-Pourçain-sur-Sioule (Limagne d’Allier) : rôle des Algues dans leur édification analogie avec les stromatolites et rapports avec la sédimentation », Paris, Bulletion de la Société Géologique de France, VIII, 1966, p. 652-662
  • Une robe héritée de brindilles-  Bernadette Bessières & Bernard Tauran, Voyage en eau douce, Cahors, Dire, 1999, p. 25.
  • -Three sorts-  Thomas BestThe Art of Angling, Londres, B. et R. Crosby, 1814, p. 25-26.
  • A strange voice-  Mona B. BickerstaffeDown Among the Waterweeds or Marvels of Pond Life, Johnstone, Edimbourg Hunter & Co., 1867.
  • -Mécontente de son aspect- Ernst F. BienzIngénieux ingénieursLa Nature est ses secrets. Édité par les chocolats Nestlé Peter Cailler Kohler, 1953.
  • -Big Chief-  Big Chief I-SpyI-Spy colour Book In Pond and Stream, Londres, New Chronicle, 1954, p. 11.
  • Remarkable masonry-  Edward F. BigelowThe Guide to Nature, vol. 6, Arcadia Connecticut,  Agassiz Association, 1913, p. 378- 379.
  • In small aquaria-  Edward F. Bigelow, « Insect Carpenters and Masons ». Popular Science Monthly, New York,  Appleton, juillet, 1916, p. 95-96.
  • -To make a collection of these curious stones homes-  Edward F. Bigelow, « On Nature’s Trail » New York, Boy’s Life,The Boy’s Scout’s Magazine, vol. VIII, n°4, avril 1918, p. 31.
  • -A monster with a body of green glass beads-  Joan Rawlins Biggar, Mystery at Camp Galena, Concordia Publishing House, 1997, p. 31.
  • -On ne connaît pas toujours son nom-  Jean-Jacques Bignon, Jeanne Cheyroux & Muriel Renaud, « La Vie de l’ Etang », Le Mulot,      n°20, 1982, p. 9.
  • -A l’abri des contacts trop rudes-  Alfred Binet, Psychologie de la création littéraire : Œuvres choisies IV, Paris, l’Harmattan, (1895- 1904), 2006.
  • -A similar attack-  F. G. Bing, « Curious behaviour of Caddis-Worm », Londres, Science-Gossip, vol. II, n° 15, mai 1895, p. 82.
  • They attach fragments of different substances-  William Bingley, Animal biography or, Popular Zoology, vol. IV, Londres, 1829, p. 125
  • -Without any regularity-  Rev. William Bingley, Useful Knowledge or a Familiar Account of the Various Productions of Nature, Mineral, Vegetable and Animal, vol. II, Londres, Gilbert & Rivington, 1852, p. 502.
  • A pedlar- Ruth Binney, Amazing & Extraordinary Facts, The English Countryside, Blue Ash, llinois, David & Charles, 2011, p. 119.
  • -Elles refusent obstinément-  Adolphe Bitard, « Les Névroptères », La Science Populaire, n°81,1°septembre, Paris, 1881, p. 1290.
  • -Elles refusent obstinément (toujours)-  Adolphe BitardL’Art et l’Industrie chez les Insectes, Paris, Librairie Générale de Vulgarisation, circa 1886, p. 196-197.
  • -Two images- Naomi Black, Virginia Woolf as Feminist,  Ithaca , Cornell Universityy, 2004, p. 34.
  • In the most obscure solitude–  William Blacker, Catechism of fly making angling and dyeing,Londres, Publié par l’auteur,   1842, p. 76-77.
  • An expert can determine the species of the occupant.- Francis Blackwell, Tiddlers & Tadpoles, Ill. A. Fraser-Brunner, Medallion Collectors n°2, Londres, Medallion, 1951, p. 31.
  • -In direct opposition to the effort of man-  Delabere P. BlaineAn Encyclopedia of Rural Sports, Londres, Longmans Green, 1870, p. 1012.
  • As a final, deadly touch- Harold F. Blaisdell, The philosophical fisherman, Londres,  Houghton Miffin Company, 1969, p. 36.
  • -Examination of stomach-  Harold F. Blaisdell, The Art of Fishing With worms and Other Live Bait, New York, Knopf, 1977, p. 81-82
  • Stony brooks–  Robert Blakey, Angling; or, how to angle and where to go, Londres, Routledge, 1858.
  • Pour the water in a clean aquarium and observeSam S.Blanc, Modern science : Earth, Life and Man,  Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1971, p. 228-229
  •  -Interesting « homes »–  Sam S. Blanc, Abraham S. Fischler et Olcott Gardner, Modern Science, Teacher’s Editions, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1965, p. 252.
  • Sixième famille-  Emile Blanchard, Histoire Naturelle des  animaux articulés, Paris, P. Duménil, 1840, p. 75-84.
  • -L’inspection-  Emile BlanchardMétamorphose, Moeurs et Instincts des Insectes, Paris,  J. G. Baillière, 1868, p. 607-608.
  • -Qu’on se transporte en Auvergne-  Emile Blanchard, La vie des êtres animés, Paris, Masson, 1888, p. 264.
  • -The rest of it can only be seen-  Rosalie Blanche & Jermaine Lulham, An introduction to Zoology, with Direction for Practical Work (Invertebrates), Londres, MacMillan, 1913, p. 317-321.
  • Marivaudage-  H-L. Alphonse BlanchonDemeures Aquatiques et Souterraines des Animaux, Paris, Delagrave, 1913, p. 196-201.
  • -In the rocky streams of Californian mountains-  Henry Meade Bland, Studies in Entomology: a practical Work on Insects, Containing Suggestions and outlines for Nature-Study in School Work, San Francisco, The Whitaker & Ray Company, 1899, p. 80.
  • Small objects like spiral univalve shells-  Thomas Bland, « Note on certain Insect Larva-Sacs, described as Species of Valvatae », New York, The Annals of the Lyceum of Natural History, vol. VIII, mai 1865, p. 144-149.
  • -The Seedling Stars-  James Blish, The Seedling Stars, New York, The New American Library, (1957) 1959, p. 104-105.
  • -Semailles humaines-  James BlishSemailles humaines, Paris, J’ai Lu, (1957) 1977, p. 147-148.
  • -L’art du camouflage-  Gérard BlondeauL’Art du camouflage. Les détectives de la nature, Paris, Épigones, 1993, p. 17.
  • -Curious investigators-  Glenn O. Blough & Julius Schwartz & Albert J. HuggettElementary School Science and how to teach it, New York, Henry Holt and Company, 1958, p. 294.
  • -Elles sont remarquables-  John Friedrich Blumenbach, Manuel d’histoire naturelle, Metz, Chez Collignon, 1803.
  • -Uncle Merry-  Enid BlytonNature Lover’s Book, Londres, Evan Brothers, 1944, p. 52.
  • Peu de jours suffisent –  Alphonse Boisduval & Achille GuenéeHistoire Naturelle des insectes : Species général des lépidoptères, vol 10. Paris, Librairie Encyclopédique de Roret, 1857, p.69-70.
  • Corps étrangers-  Pierre Boitard, Encyclopédie Roret, Entomologie Histoire Naturelle des Insectes et  des Myriapodes, tome III, Paris, Roret, 1843, p. 129.
  • -Ready-made- Frank Bolles, Land of the Lingering Snow, Chronicles of a Stroller in New England from January to June, Boston/ New York, Houghton Mifflin, 1893, p. 68.
  • -Cumbrous and man-  Rev. B.C. BollesThe Occasional Sermon, United States General Convention of Universalits. Minutes of the Session of 1867, Baltimore, Held, 1867.
  • -A kind of tape- Alexandre BonifaceDictionnaire français –anglais et anglais-français, Paris, Belin, Mandar & Devaux, 1830, p. 102.
  • Si vous triturez grossièrement-  Rodolphe Bonet, Délassements Entomologiques, Paris, L. Roque, 1911, p. 140-142.
  • Commençons le dépouillement de ces richesses-  Rodolphe Bonet, Délassements Entomologiques, 2° série, Paris, Léon L’homme, 1921, p. 101.
  • -Les matières qu’elles mettent en œuvre-  Charles Bonnet, Contemplation de la nature, Amsterdam, Marc-Michel Rey, 1769, p. 209.
  • -Unique structures-  Gary A. Borger, Naturals, A Guide to Food Organisms of the Trout, Harrisburg, Pa, Stackpole Books, 1980, p. 83.
  • -Des règles générales-  Alessandro Borgioli & Giuliano CappelliLa vie dans les marais, Paris, Atlas, 1978, p. 50.
  • -Parfois franchement jaune dans les rivières calcaires.-  V. Borlandelli, « La truite au porte-bois », La pêche et les poissons, Paris,  n°492, mai 1986, p. 92.
  • -Sur le fond caillouteux-  Bernadette BornancinLe monde des eaux douces, Saint-Laurent-du–Var, Panini, 1990, p. 4.
  • Some are oval  Donald J. Borror & Dwight M. DelongAn Introduction to the Study of Insects, New York, Rinehart and Company, 1954, p. 437.
  • -Quelques brins de feuillage roulés-  J. B. G. Bory de Saint-VincentVoyage dans les quatre principales iles des mers d’Afrique, fait par ordre du gouvernement, pendant les années neuf et dix de la République (1801 et 1802), tome second, Paris, Chez F. Buisson, 1804.
  • -Il a tout lieu de penser-  L. Bosc, « Note », Paris,  Journal des Mines, tome 17, 1805, p. 397-399.
  • Proportionnés à sa grandeur-  Antonin BossuNouveau Dictionnaire d’histoire Naturelle et des phénomènes de la nature, Paris, Au Bureau de l’Abeille Médicale, 1859, p. 173-174.
  • -Les premières illustrations de Trichoptères-  Lazare Botosaneanu et Peter. C. Barnard, « The earliest illustrations of Trichoptera », traduction de l’anglais par Jacques Demarcq, Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on Trichoptera, Columbus (Ohio), Ohio Biological Survey, 1997, p. 49-52.
  • -Un étui soyeux blindé intérieurement-  E. BouantDictionnaire-Manuel-Illustré des Sciences Usuelles, Paris, Librairie Armand Colin, 1926.
  • Calcaires d’eau douce-  Nérée BoubéeGéologie élémentaire appliquée à l’agriculture et à l’industrie avec un Dictionnaire des termes de Géologie et des Sciences Accessoires contenant plus de 1000 mots ; ou Manuel de Géologie, Paris, Au Bureau de l’Echo du Monde Savant et chez L. Hachette, 1838, p. 295.
  • -Des fourreaux pour tous les goûts-  Christian BouchardyCopain de la nature, Toulouse, Milan Jeunesse, 2004, p. 171.
  • -Des éléments variés-  H. Boué & R. Chanton, Zoologie I, Invertébrés, Paris, G. Doin, 1958, p. 394.
  • Se cacher sous des éléments du décor-  Christophe Bouget, Secrets d’insectes : 1001 curiosités du peuple à 6 pattes, Quae, Versailles, 2016, p. 154.
  • Ayant l’aspect de petit fagot de bois sec– M. N. BouilletDictionnaire Universel des Sciences des Lettres et des Arts, Paris, Hachette, 1877.
  • -The instinct of orientation-  Edward George BoulengerThe aquarium Book, Londres, Duckworth, 1925, p. 144-145.
  • -Experts-  Edward George BoulengerThe Under-water World,  Londres, Hodder and Stoughton. Circa 1925, p.108-109.
  • -The most dazzling effects-  Edward George BoulengerAnimal mysteries, Ill. L. Brightwell, Londres, Duckworth, 1927, p. 126.
  • -In the Zoo-  Edward George BoulengerAnimal Ways, LondresWard, Lock & Co., 1931, p. 102.
  • If no other material is at hand-  Edward George Boulenger, Richard  St. Barbe Baker, L.C. Bushby etc.Nature in Britain: An illustrated Survey, LondresBatsford T., 1936, p. 125.
  • Coralline and sea-weed- Edward George BoulengerWorld Natural History, Londres, B. T. Batsford, 1937, p. 230.
  • Tiny creatures-  Edward George BoulengerWild life the world over, New York, Wise & Co., 1947, p. 512-515.
  • Elle traine avec elle son fourreau-  M. Boule & Ch. Gravier & H. LecomteCours d’Histoire Naturelle pour l’Enseignement Primaire Supérieur, Paris, Masson et Cie, 1916, p. 135-136.
  • Étude facile-  V. Boulet & A. ObréSciences Naturelles, classes de cinquième A et B, 1° partie Insectes, Paris, Hachette, 1938, p. 74.
  • -Elle habite ce tube-  V. BouletZoologie et Botanique, classe de cinquième, Paris, Hachette, 1924, p. 17-18.
  • -La prévoyante bonté de la Providence-  Abbé J.-J. Bourassé, Les insectes, Tours, A. Mame, 1881.
  • Une curieuse coquille-  J. R. Bourguignat, « Remarques sur la brochure de M. Tassinari », Paris, Revue et Magazine Zoologique, série 2, t. XI, 1859, p. 545-546.
  • Brins d’herbe-  Bournique, « Histoire Naturelle », Manuel général de l’instruction primaire, Paris, n° 43, 26 octobre 1889, p.347.
  • -Classe de Cinquième-  Georges Bourreil & Eugène LasnierSciences Naturelles, Zoologie- Botanique, Classe de Cinquième,  2° Année des Cours complémentaires, Paris, Magnard, 1948, p. 80.
  • -Maisonnettes- A. Bourrit, « Notes sur ces cas de nidifications anormale du martin-pêcheur » Ornis, Bulletin du Comité Ornithologique International, Paris, Masson, 1899, p. 190.
  • -Très vulnérable-  Serge BoutinotLa vie secrète des eaux dormantes, Bruxelles, Rossel, 1975, p. 84-85.
  • -On conçoit-  Eugène Louis Bouvier, Habitudes et métamorphoses des insectes, Paris, Ernest Flammarion, 1921.
  • A second specimen-  Charlotte Elizabeth BowenEdwin and Mary: or  the mother’s cabinet. A book for the Young, Londres,  Ward Lock & Co, (1878) 1894, p. 14-15.
  • -It is an excellent bait for Trout, Roach, Dace or Chub-  Charles Bowlker, Art of Angling, Londres, Procter & Jones, 1826, p. 125.
  • -Stucco work-  Richard BowlkerThe Universal Angler or That Art Improved in all its parts especially in Fly-Fishing. Londres, 1766, p. 17.
  • -The beginning of July-  Richard Bowlker,  The Art of Angling or Complete fly & bottom-fisher, Londres, H. Procter Ludlow, 1814.
  • Qui s’engendre parmi la paille-  Abel BoyerThe Royal Dictionary, French and English, English and French, Londres, 1773, p. 70.
  • -Une vraie gourmandise-  Paul Boyer, L’Année du pêcheur, Paris, Nathan, 1997, p 66 et 67.
  • -19 mai et 27 juin  Boyer de Fonscolombe, Calendrier de faune et de flore, Aix, chez Veuve Tavernier, 1845.
  • -Ah mon père- Boyer de Fonscolombe, Entomologie élémentaire ou entretiens sur les insectes, Paris, Roret, 1852. p. 103.
  • -The Agony and the ego-  Clare Boylan, The Agony and the ego: the art and strategy of fiction writing explored, Rutherford New Jersey, Penguin, 1994.
  • A kind of low-priced woollen stuff-  Thomas Boys, « Meaning of  Cadewoldes », Notes and queries: a medium of enter communication for literary, Londres, Bell & Daldy, Second Series, vol. 8, p. 98, juillet-décembre 1859.
  • All so small that the whole collection would easily rest on a threepenny bit !Evangeline Bradhurst, « Shells in our Rivers and Ditches », The Essex Review, Colchester,  vol. XVII, n°65, janvier 1908, p. 90.
  • -A Philosophical account of the Works of nature-  Richard Bradley,  A Philosophical account of the Works of nature, Londres, James Hodges.  1739, p. 200-201.
  • -Scouts-  James Chester Bradley & E. L. Palmer,  Insect Life: a manual for the use of scouts in fulfilling the requirements for the insect life merit badge and for all students of insect life,  New-York,  The Boy Scouts of America, 1925, p. 12.
  • The Emperor’s clothes-  Walter Russell BrainThe nature of experience, Londres, Oxford University Press, 1959, p. 2.
  • -Stones that move-  Floyd BralliarKnowing insects through stories, New-York, Funk & Wagnalls Company, (1918) 1921, p. 202-207.
  • -Cad-  Mary BramstonA steadfast woman, Londres, Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1871, p. 237.
  • The three-inch conglomerations of twigs and leaves-  Paul H. Bratton, « Of Caddis Flies Kingfishers and Trout », Richmond (VA), Virginia Wildlife, vol. XXXVII, n°3, septembre 1976, p. 26.
  • -Pour donner une idée-  Alfred Edmund BrehmLes Insectes, tome 1, édition française par J. Kunckel d’Herculais, Paris, Baillière, 1881, p. 513.
  • -A la moindre alerte-  Georges Bresse & Christian SchlegelSciences Naturelles, classe de cinquième, Paris, Baillière & Fils, 1935, p. 102-103.
  • In the bowl- M. M. Brewster, A. A. Brewster & N. Crouch, Life stories of Australian Insect, Sydney, Dymocks Book Arcade, 1946, p. 71-72.
  • -Phryganidae-  John Joseph BriggsThe Peacock at Rowsley, where Andrew, Alexis and the Naturalist Met, and whart came of their visit, Londres, Bemrose & Sons, 1869, p. 3.
  • -Sooner or later- Thomas Henry Briggs, Isabel MacKinney, Florence Vane SkeffingtonJunior High School English, Londres, Ginn & Company, 1921.
  • Ornamental effect-  Leonard Robert BrightwellThe Pond People, Londres, W. Gardner, Darton, 1949, p. 50-51.
  • -In active motion-  Eliza BrightwenRambles with Nature Students, Londres, The Religious Tract Society, 1895, p. 223.
  • -Plein de minuscules cailloux colorésAntoine Brin & Lionel Valladares, Mon encyclo de petites bêtes, Toulouse, Milan Jeunesse, 2010, p. 92
  • -They immediate start to build-  Anthony BristoweFresh Water Fishing, New York, Taplinger Publishing, 1964, p. 252.
  • Les débris d’un couvre-objet pour préparations microscopiques-  Frank Brocher, Regarde, Paris, Fernand Nathan, 1935, p. 28.
  • -The extented phenotype- John Brockman, The third culture beyond the scientific révolution, New York, Simon & Schuster, 1995.
  • Royal blossoms-  Frances Freeling BroderipChrysal or a Story with an End, Londres, Saunders, Otley and Co., 1861, p. 13.
  • Tiny Tadpole-  Frances Freeling BroderipTiny Tadpole and Others Tales, Londres, Griffith & Farran, 1862, p. 4.
  • -Une multitude de tubes droits et courts-  A. Brongniart, « Sur des terrains qui apparaissent avoir été formés sous l’eau douce », Paris, Annales du Muséum d’Histoire Naturelle, vol. 15, 1810, p. 392-393.
  • -Une sorte de trompe-  Charles BrongniartHistoire Naturelle populaire, L’homme et les animaux, Paris, Ernest Flammarion, 1892.
  • -Feature for species-  Christer Brönmark & Lars-Anders HanssonThe Biology of Lakes and Ponds, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1998, p. 82.
  • -School of writers-  Rupert Brooke, John Webster and the Elizabethan Drama, New York, John Lane, 1906, p. 160.
  • -Broken glass-  E. S. BrownLife in Fresh Water, Londres, Oxford University Press, 1955, p. 15.
  • -In the shallow-  John J. Brown, The American Angler’s Guide; or complete Fisher’s Manual for the United States, New York, D. Appleton & Co., 1857, p. 36-37.
  • -Coprolites-  Robert Brown, Our eath and its story: a popular treatise on physical geography, vol. 2, 1890, p. 30.
  • Small life-  Vinson BrownThe Amateur Naturalist Handbook, BostonLittle, Brown and Company, 1948, p. 279-280.
  • -Miniature zoo- Vinson BrownHow to make a Miniature Zoo, Boston, Little Brown and Company, 1956, p. 91.
  • Natural History with a camera-  Leverett White Brownell, Natural History with a camera, Boston, American Photographic Publishing Company, 1942, p. 108-109.
  • -Jewelled caddis-worms cases-  Charles T. Brues, « Jewelled caddis-worms cases », Psyche, vol. XXXVII, n° 4, Cambridge (Mass), Cambridge Entomological Club, 1930, p. 392-394.
  • Orné de pierres précieuses-  Charles T. Brues, « Des étuis de phrygane 
ornés de pierres précieuses », Psyche, vol. XXXVII, n° 4, traduit de l’anglais par Jacques Demarcq,  Cambridge (Mass) , Cambridge Entomological Club, 1930, p. 392-394.
  • -Moins poétique-  C. BruyantLes insectes de nos lacs, Clermont-Ferrand, Typographie et Lithographie Mont-Louis, 1894.
  • -Les pauvres bêtes-  Ernest Jean Van BruysselHistoire d’un aquarium et de ses habitants, Paris, J. Hetzel, 1865, p. 49.
  • Des coquilles entières-  Pierre-Joseph Buc’hoz,  Fauna Gallicus Dictionnaire Vétérinaire et des animaux domestiques, Paris, Chez Brunet 1775, p. 273.
  • On the Beauties, Harmonies, and Sublimities – Charles Bucke, On the Beauties, Harmonies, and Sublimities of Nature, vol. IV, Londres, G ?. & W. B. Whittaker, 1823.
  • -Curiosities-   T. BucklandCuriosities of Natural History, Londres, Richard Bentley, 1871, p. 233.
  • Ingenious experiment-  Frank T. BucklandFish hatching, Londres, Tinsley Brothers, 1863, p. 244-246.
  • Accusated of eating trout eggs-  Frank Buckland, “On fish hatching”. Journal of the Society of Arts, Londres, 11 mars 1864.
  • -Une autre preuve-   William BucklandLa géologie et la minéralogie sans leurs rapports avec la Théologie naturelle, vol. I, Paris,  Crochard et Cie, 1838.
  • And dragging-  Arabella BuckleyLide and her Children, Glimpses of Animal Life, Londres, Edward Stanford, 1880, p. 221-222.
  • -Au milieu il y a quelque chose de vivant-  Arabella B. Buckley,  La vie des animaux et des plantes dans les jardins, les champs et la rivière, , traduit et adapté de l’anglais par Mlle Peschard, Paris, Bibliothèque d’Education, circa 1939, p. 39-40.
  • -Is so distinctive-  Stefan Buczacki, Fauna Britannica, Londres, Hamlyn, 2002, p. 89.
  • -They are fairy –   L.M. Budgen, March winds and April showers : being notes and notions on a few created things, Londres, L. Reeve, 1854, p. 109-112.
  • Having no armor for its protection- . J. W. BuelThe Savage World A Complete Natural History of the World’s Creatures, Fishes, Reptiles, Insects, Birds and Mammals, PhiladelphieHistorical  Publishing Company, 1891.
  • -The center of the universe-  Lawrence Buell, The Environmental Imagination, Thoreau, Nature Writing, and the Formation of American Culture, Cambridge (Ma), The Belknap Press of Havard University Press, 1995, p. 100-102 et 107.
  • Avec des objets pris dans le monde extérieur-  L.-V. Bujeau, L’œuvre de J. H. Fabre et la psychologie de l’insecte, Paris, P.U. F., 1940, p. 16.
  • in sarcophagi- Morgan Bulkeley, Berkshire Stories, Great Barrington (MA), 2004.
  • -Il faut qu’une porte soit ouverte ou fermée-  Jean-Baptiste Bullet, L’Existence de Dieu démontrée par les Merveilles de la Nature, Paris,  Chez Valade, 1768, p. 170-171.
  • -Art and Understanding-  Margaret Hattersley BulleyArt and Understanding, Londres, B.T. Batsford, 1937, p. 129.
  • New building material does not make a new architec Hermon C. Bumpus,                           « The variations and mutations of the introduced sparrow. Passer Domesticus », Biological Lectures delivered at The Marine Biological Laboratory of Wood’s Holl,Boston, Ginn & Company, 1898, p. 14.
  • Il est amusant d’avaler tout rond, larve et maison!-  Tony Burnand, Crochebec et bec-bleu, Paris, Berger-Levrault, 1974.
  • -Contre les dangers extérieurs-  Tony Burnand & Charles C. Ritz, A la mouche. Méthodes et matériels modernes pour la pêche à la mouche de la truite, de l’ombre, du poisson blanc, Paris, Librairie des Champs-Elysées, 1939, p. 270.
  • -In every school roman-  Edward Burnham, « Nature Study Lessons XI » , Nature Study, Manchester, Manchester Institute of Arts and Science, vol. III, 1903, p. 218-219.
  • -Under the stones-  Edward Burnham, « The Home of the Black-Fly », Manchester Institute of Arts and Science, Manchester, vol. IV, 1904, p. 83.
  • -A more laborious-  John Barlow Burton, Lectures on Entomology, Londres, Simpkin and Marshall, 1837.
  • -He opened the hand slowly- Mallory BurtonReading the water: stories and essays of flyfishing and life, Sandpoint Idaho, Keokee Co Publishing, 1995, p. 74.
  • -Portable homes-  Maurice Burton, Natural History of Britain, Londres, The Shell & Rainbird Reference Books, 1970, p. 226.
  • -Merrill decided- Maurice Burton, The sixth sense of animals, New York,  Ballantine Books, 1973.
  • One advantage is that there is not much else to do-  Robert Burton, Ponds: Their Wildlife and Upkeep, Londres, David & Charles, 1977, p. 57
  • …..and immature caddis flies in their little tubes.- Phyllis S. Busch & Arlines Strong, Puddles and Ponds, Cleveland & New York, The World Publishing Company, 1969,
  • -The wondrous mosaic cylinder- R. H. Busk, « Animated Horsehairs », Notes and Queries a Medium of Entercommunication for Literary Men, General Readers, etc., Londres, 18 septembre 1886, p. 230.
  • -Particulary beautiful-  R. H. Busk, « Animated Horsehairs », Notes and Queries a Medium of Entercommunication for Literary Men, General Readers, etc., Londres, 26 mars 1887, p. 249-250.
  • -With wonderful patience-  Henry D. ButlerThe Family Aquarium, New York, Dick & Filzgerald, 1858.
  • -The nature of the external adornment-  Edwar Albert ButlerPond life insects, Londres, Swan Sonnenschein  Lowrey, 1886, p. 67-69.
  • -The story was allegorical –  Antonia Byatt, Sugar and Other Stories, New York, Charles Scribner’s, 1987.
AnonymeABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ